Gifts of Imperfection – Introduction, Week 1

10 Sep

If you’ve read my about page, you know how much Brene Brown’s work has inspired me to live an authentic life – to be vulnerable and honest with myself and others.  After I saw her video (linked on the about page), I downloaded Gifts of Imperfection: Letting Go of Who You Think You’re Supposed to Be and Embrace Who You Are to my Kindle and devoured it in a matter of days.

It was life-changing.

It allowed me to gently look at who I know myself to be and to examine why I was hiding my true self from others.  It taught me about the perils of shame.  And it pushed me to write my story.  This story.  My blog is the result of a giant leap of faith I took after completing the book.  Brene wrote about how vulnerability contributes to happiness – and so I told the world about my PPD.  Fearful of the reaction, I pressed the “publish” button.  I have never regretted that click.

So I’d like to share the book with you.  I started discussing it with my friends over at Mama’s Comfort Camp on Facebook, but feel like this might be a better place.  I’ll summarize a chapter each week and ask you to respond to a prompt to get us started.  You can join in at any time, and there is no deadline on a chapter.  I’ll add a Discuss tab to the menu bar so you can find the discussion easily.

Here’s where you can find a copy of the book.  And here is Brene’s blog, which is awesome.  She has a new book called Daring Greatly, which I can’t wait to read.  When I have time to read again, that is.  😉

There’s a preface, but I’d like to start with the Introduction.  Ready?

Gifts of Imperfection, Introduction

The introduction is an overview of the entire book…a little of everything. Brene talks about her interpretation of Wholeheartedness and suggests that daily practice of courage, compassion, belonging, and being vulnerable can lead to already fulfilling life.

The sentence that resonated the most with me is on the first page: “No matter what gets done and how much is left undone, I am enough.” I want to get back to a place where I believe this about myself.  I measure the successfulness of my days by counting dishes in the sink and crumbs on the floor.  I calculate how much I depended on other people for help and feel guilty or “less than” for needing it.  I know I’m not alone in being my harshest critic, and I think that this idea of unconditional worth could be transformational for us all.

What was your immediate reaction to the sentence above?  What kind of emotions did it bring up for you?

What sentence/idea from this chapter resonated the most with you, and why?

 

Disclaimer: I purchased the book Gifts of Imperfection on my own and am not being compensated for my review of the book or for promoting it. I receive no kickback from any of the Amazon links provided above. I simply love the book and want to share.

3 Responses to “Gifts of Imperfection – Introduction, Week 1”

  1. Mama Mubba September 12, 2012 at 10:08 am #

    One of my most freeing moments was when I was finally able to say to people “I struggle with depression and anxiety. I finally got myself into therapy. Its changed me.” For some reason, mental health isn’t something that people are willing to discuss when it comes to their own. And its a shame- I battled PPD and anxiety for almost five years on my own. I missed out on so much life. My hope is that women will start coming forward, saying ‘its okay to get help’ and no one will have to feel like she is less of a person for it. Good luck on your journey- and congratulations on how far you’ve come!

    • learnedhappiness September 12, 2012 at 1:09 pm #

      So glad you found freedom in telling people about your depression and anxiety. Later in the book, Brene talks about how shame is perpetuated by secrecy. I have definitely found this to be true!

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Gifts Of Imperfection – Courage, Compassion, and Connection, Week Two « Learned Happiness - September 17, 2012

    […] you’re just joining in, you can find Week One here.  And the link to the book here. […]

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